The Skinners Arms

Skinner's arm

Skinner’s arm

I promised here a story of a performing lady and her abdominal scar. Here it is.

The year is 1973, the place south London. The time is Friday evening, and the story concerns four young men attending King’s College Hospital Medical School who were taking an evening stroll. As they proceeded from Camberwell in a north-westerly direction towards The Oval, a thirst descended upon them somewhere in salubrious north Brixton.

Behold, seest thou yonder hostelry?
Yea, verily. Let us thither hie to slake our thirst.
Aye, aye. Come, make haste.

It was—you’ve guessed it—the Skinners Arms (there is no information concerning whether or not there was an apostrophe, and if so where it went) on the corner of Vassall Road and Camberwell New Road. According to Wikimapia it is no longer in existence, having doubtless succumbed to town planners. Anyhoo … the four knights did enter.

If it be thy pleasure, fair serving wench, we parchèd wanderers each desire a tankard of thy most toothsome nectar.
Most certainly, wandering lords, quoth she.

Some time and several flagons later, behold the lights did dim. Music rang forth and lo, a performing lady materialized on the podium. This surprised the knaves. Nevertheless, they steeled themselves to witness a spectacle. The performing lady, they were astonished to see, gradually divested herself of her habiliments until she stood before the assembled company wearing only a two-piece bikini. She had a midline scar below the umbilicus.

Ah, comrades, espiest-ye the scar? Perhaps the lady hath undergone an hysterectomy.

It was not that the utterance itself was foolish, but rather the volume at which it rang forth, for the intended whisper cameth more as proclamation. If thou understandest that, thou dost apprehend the nub of the issue.

Thou art mistaken, fair friend, quoth the lady, for ‘tis an appendix scar.

And having uttered those very words the bikini-clad performer hied herself to the bench at which the knaves were seated, and sat on the knee of one of them, and polished his spectacles with one of her removèd garments.

Now, the knaves were, admittedly, junior medical students, but they possess’d enough knowledge to know that appendicectomy does not normally require a midline incision in the lower abdomen. Nevertheless, they sensed that circumstances were not propitious for further discussion of the issue. They felt that discretion was in their best interests, and without further quaffing or quoting they legged it onwards, returning to their lodgings to prepare for the rigours of the weekend. The young men were lucky, methinks, not to be set upon by the lady’s supporters.

The moral of this story? To draw conclusions from observations is good, but any proclamation of the same should be timely rather than immediate. The youth learnt a lesson.

Every sinner has a future, and every saint a past (Cardinal Hume, I think).

About Rambling Rector

Church of England Parish Priest
This entry was posted in A great future behind me, Medical, Pastoralia. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The Skinners Arms

  1. Pingback: A medical student at work | Rambling Rector

  2. Pingback: A tale of two churches | Rambling Rector

  3. tom farrell says:

    This story becomes implausible at the point where we are expected to believe that the medical students are surprised by the appearance of the disrobing lady, unless perhaps the are the very same 4 men who buy Playboy magazine every month for the articles on existentialist philosophy and automotive engineering and never fail to be surprised at finding pictures of naked women in it.
    TF

    • Indeed. That’s what I thought too. However, I can record only what I am told. There are one or two other details that could have been added, but I judged it better that they remain unrecorded.

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